Are churches building?


The world changed in the fall of 2008 and the church construction world was not exempt.  Contractors and architects who specialize in church construction saw the same slow down and lay offs as the private sector did.  Church construction did not completely stop and is beginning to see some upticks in 2012.

The key outcome of the economic slow down in the construction world is people are being smarter and asking more questions.  Banks are forcing a lot of churches to ask better, deeper, and more thorough questions, but church construction committees now feel the pressure even more than before to be good stewards with the dollars the people give toward a project.

One of the biggest problems in project cost overruns is not doing the proper planning on the front end.  A lack of planning and vision for the total project are often the root of these problems.  The choice of the delivery method for your next construction project is paramount more than ever to help avoid escalated project costs.

Design/Build is one delivery method and in a recent blog post  Tim Cool of Visioneering Studios highlighted the pros and cons of the design/build delivery method.

If you are planning a building or even thinking that your church might have a project in the next five years you should find this information helpful.

Let me know your thoughts and let Tim know your thoughts as well.

Tim writes:

It is widely accepted that design/build projects, when done in a project centric, open-book environment; result in some of the very best development and construction projects for churches.

However, design/build is far too often misrepresented, misunderstand and given a bad name by firms that abuse their contractual relationship with their clients. So, let me try to shed some light on the the primary methods of design/build in the market today.  So….read more

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