From campaign to culture – keeping generosity momentum on your side


Over the past ten years I have had the privilege of working with over 70 churches on various projects; most of them being capital campaigns.  I can honestly say that all have been successful.  There have been varying degrees of success, but all successful.  We work really hard to communicate the vision of the project, create momentum, actively engage the congregation in the campaign, educate the people on biblical stewardship, and challenge people to pray about giving sacrificially.  If done well and with intentionality, the process works!  Money is committed and momentum (Big Mo) is on your side.

What happens after Commitment Sunday is often times very disturbing to me.  Everyone at the church takes a big deep breath and is thrilled that the campaign did well but equally thrilled that it is over!  Campaigns are hard work.  However, the church and its’ leaders need to capitalize on the momentum created around the subject of stewardship and the giving of one’s financial resources.  Unfortunately this doesn’t happen often.  Some of that is because I am no longer there on a regular basis.  Our contract is over and there is no one there to consistently keep generosity and stewardship in the forefront of leader’s minds.  Responsibility also falls on the shoulders of the church and its’ leaders.  When I have encouraged leaders to keep moving I have heard comments like this:

1.  I’m tired of talking about money.

2.  I (pastor) can’t keep preaching about money because there will be a backlash.

3.  Who will lead the charge?

4.  We don’t need to keep talking about it now.  Surely everyone has gotten the message.

I am not wanting the church to talk about money all of the time.  I don’t want to hear that in my own church.  What I am suggesting is that the church be intentional about creating a Generosity Game Plan that not only incorporates over and above giving for capital campaigns but incorporates the everyday giving needs of the church.  Every church would like for their operating budget to increase, right? 

There is a great opportunity with a small window of time after the completion of a capital campaign to utilize the momentum to take your congregation toward a passionate culture of generosity.  Will your church keep Big Mo on its’ side?

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